twodee:

I drew these dota2/pokemon mash-ups a while back. Thought that I’d post them in a photoset. Each hero and pokemon have similar abilities.  

428 notes

gamefreaksnz:

Beyond: Two Souls – new gameplay footage, screenshots, concept art

Quantic Dream has released some unseen gameplay footage and a cluster of screens and artworks from their upcoming action adventure title Beyond: Two Souls.

660 notes

gamefreaksnz:

Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII screens

Square Enix has released a set of new screenshots from Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII.

470 notes

gamefreaksnz:

Brothers by Carson Catlin

Created for the “Game On” group show at 1AM SF.
The show opens on March 22nd. They will retail for $500 a piece or $900 for both.

Artist: Website | Twitter

440 notes

itsfullofstars:

First Images Released From Newest Earth Observation Satellite

NASA and the Department of the Interior’s U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have released the first images from the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) satellite, which was launched Feb. 11.

The natural-color images show the intersection of the United States Great Plains and the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains in Wyoming and Colorado. In the images, green coniferous forests in the mountains stretch down to the brown plains with Denver and other cities strung south to north.

LDCM acquired the images at about 1:40 p.m. EDT March 18. The satellite’s Operational Land Imager (OLI) and Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) instruments observed the scene simultaneously. The USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science Center in Sioux Falls, S.D., processed the data.

LDCM is the eighth in the Landsat series of satellites that have been continuously observing Earth’s land surfaces since 1972.

199 notes

sagansense:

Library of Congress to Preserve 1st Message from SpaceThe first audio message to be relayed from outer space will be preserved as part of the National Recording Registry alongside Pink Floyd’s “The Dark Side of the Moon,” Simon and Garfunkel’s “Sounds of Silence,” and Chubby Checker’s rendition of “The Twist,” the Library of Congress announced Thursday (March 21). The space-based message, which was a recording of then-President Dwight Eisenhower conveying “America’s wish for peace on Earth and goodwill toward men everywhere,” was broadcast Dec. 19, 1958, from aboard the world’s first communications satellite, Project Signal Communications by Orbiting Relay Equipment, or SCORE.
The 30-second transmission, heard by shortwave radio as the satellite passed overhead, is one of 25 recordings that were selected by the Library of Congress because of their cultural, artistic and historic importance to the aural legacy of the United States.
“Congress created the [Registry] to celebrate the richness and variety of our audio heritage,” said James Billington, Librarian of Congress, in a statement. “And to underscore our responsibility for long-term preservation, to assure that legacy can be appreciated and studied for generations.”
Under the National Recording Preservation Act, Billington, as Librarian, and with advice from the National Recording Preservation Board, is tasked every year with selecting 25 recordings that are “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” and are at least 10 years old. The selections for 2012 bring the total number of recordings held in the registry to 375. [Video: 1st Song Recorded in Space]
SCORE for space history Project SCORE was not the United States’ first satellite in space — that distinction goes to Explorer 1, launched on Jan. 31, 1958 — but in addition to it being the world’s first communications satellite, the project also marked the first use of a missile-guidance system to steer a satellite into orbit.
The Dec. 18, 1958 liftoff was the first successful use of Convair’s Atlas intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) as a space-launch vehicle — a rocket that would later go on to lofting the first American astronauts into orbit.
Project SCORE, as the first endeavor of the then newly-established Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), was devised in six months under complete secrecy. Only 88 people were ever aware of Project SCORE prior to its launch, and of those, 53 were purposely misled to believe the project had been canceled before its planned liftoff.
Rather than the launch vehicle deploying the satellite as a separate spacecraft, SCORE’s communications package was built into the Atlas’ fairing pods and the entire rocket body entered orbit. At 9,000 pounds (4080 kilograms), it was the heaviest object to circle the planet at the time.
President Eisenhower recorded his message in the White House two days before it was heard relayed from space. The audio was loaded onto a tape recorder, one of two aboard SCORE, which ground stations in the southern United States could command to play back the message.
Eisenhower’s message was, “This is the President of the United States speaking. Through the marvels of scientific advance, my voice is coming to you via a satellite circling in outer space. My message is a simple one: Through this unique means I convey to you and all mankind, America’s wish for peace on Earth and goodwill toward men everywhere.”
Posterity’s playlist The addition of Eisenhower’s Project SCORE broadcast to the National Recording Registry means more than it just being added to a list of songs and spoken word titles. The 30-second space message will now be actively preserved for future generations.
The Library of Congress is identifying and preserving the best existing versions of each recording on the registry. These recordings will be housed in the Library’s Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation in Culpeper, Va., a state-of-the-art facility that is home to more than 6 million items, including nearly 3.5 million sound recordings.
After 10 years of collaborative effort and the 2010 release of the first comprehensive study on the state of recorded-sound preservation in the United States, the Library unveiled its plan last month to save the country’s endangered aural legacy. This long and short-term blueprint covers the strategies for infrastructure, preservation, access, policy, and education.
In addition to the Project SCORE audio and the recordings earlier identified, the 2012 selections for the registry also include the soundtrack to the 1977 John Travolta movie “Saturday Night Fever,” the radio broadcast featuring Will Rogers’ 1931 folksy insights in support of Herbert Hoover’s nationwide unemployment relief campaign aired during the Great Depression, and The Ramones self-titled 1976 rock album.
Click through to collectSPACE.com to listen to President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s Project SCORE audio message, as now a part of the National Recording Registry.

sagansense:

Library of Congress to Preserve 1st Message from Space

The first audio message to be relayed from outer space will be preserved as part of the National Recording Registry alongside Pink Floyd’s “The Dark Side of the Moon,” Simon and Garfunkel’s “Sounds of Silence,” and Chubby Checker’s rendition of “The Twist,” the Library of Congress announced Thursday (March 21).

The space-based message, which was a recording of then-President Dwight Eisenhower conveying “America’s wish for peace on Earth and goodwill toward men everywhere,” was broadcast Dec. 19, 1958, from aboard the world’s first communications satellite, Project Signal Communications by Orbiting Relay Equipment, or SCORE.

The 30-second transmission, heard by shortwave radio as the satellite passed overhead, is one of 25 recordings that were selected by the Library of Congress because of their cultural, artistic and historic importance to the aural legacy of the United States.

“Congress created the [Registry] to celebrate the richness and variety of our audio heritage,” said James Billington, Librarian of Congress, in a statement. “And to underscore our responsibility for long-term preservation, to assure that legacy can be appreciated and studied for generations.”

Under the National Recording Preservation Act, Billington, as Librarian, and with advice from the National Recording Preservation Board, is tasked every year with selecting 25 recordings that are “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” and are at least 10 years old. The selections for 2012 bring the total number of recordings held in the registry to 375. [Video: 1st Song Recorded in Space]

SCORE for space history
Project SCORE was not the United States’ first satellite in space — that distinction goes to Explorer 1, launched on Jan. 31, 1958 — but in addition to it being the world’s first communications satellite, the project also marked the first use of a missile-guidance system to steer a satellite into orbit.

The Dec. 18, 1958 liftoff was the first successful use of Convair’s Atlas intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) as a space-launch vehicle — a rocket that would later go on to lofting the first American astronauts into orbit.

Project SCORE, as the first endeavor of the then newly-established Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), was devised in six months under complete secrecy. Only 88 people were ever aware of Project SCORE prior to its launch, and of those, 53 were purposely misled to believe the project had been canceled before its planned liftoff.

Rather than the launch vehicle deploying the satellite as a separate spacecraft, SCORE’s communications package was built into the Atlas’ fairing pods and the entire rocket body entered orbit. At 9,000 pounds (4080 kilograms), it was the heaviest object to circle the planet at the time.

President Eisenhower recorded his message in the White House two days before it was heard relayed from space. The audio was loaded onto a tape recorder, one of two aboard SCORE, which ground stations in the southern United States could command to play back the message.

Eisenhower’s message was, “This is the President of the United States speaking. Through the marvels of scientific advance, my voice is coming to you via a satellite circling in outer space. My message is a simple one: Through this unique means I convey to you and all mankind, America’s wish for peace on Earth and goodwill toward men everywhere.”

Posterity’s playlist
The addition of Eisenhower’s Project SCORE broadcast to the National Recording Registry means more than it just being added to a list of songs and spoken word titles. The 30-second space message will now be actively preserved for future generations.

The Library of Congress is identifying and preserving the best existing versions of each recording on the registry. These recordings will be housed in the Library’s Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation in Culpeper, Va., a state-of-the-art facility that is home to more than 6 million items, including nearly 3.5 million sound recordings.

After 10 years of collaborative effort and the 2010 release of the first comprehensive study on the state of recorded-sound preservation in the United States, the Library unveiled its plan last month to save the country’s endangered aural legacy. This long and short-term blueprint covers the strategies for infrastructure, preservation, access, policy, and education.

In addition to the Project SCORE audio and the recordings earlier identified, the 2012 selections for the registry also include the soundtrack to the 1977 John Travolta movie “Saturday Night Fever,” the radio broadcast featuring Will Rogers’ 1931 folksy insights in support of Herbert Hoover’s nationwide unemployment relief campaign aired during the Great Depression, and The Ramones self-titled 1976 rock album.

Click through to collectSPACE.com to listen to President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s Project SCORE audio message, as now a part of the National Recording Registry.

120 notes

theyetee:

Teamwork!
by Bleee

Prepare for Trouble
by Megan Lara

$11 on 03/22 only at The Yetee

417 notes

ohyeahdevelopmentalbiology:

ucsdhealthsciences:

Tidings of stem
Yesterday’s announcement that John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka would share the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine is the latest evidence that stem cell science has come a long, long way – though not yet where scientists, doctors and ordinary people hope it will someday be.
Gurdon and Yamanaka were honored for a pair of landmark discoveries made almost half a century later.
In 1962, Gurdon was the first to clone an animal. Taking an intestinal cell from an adult frog, Gurdon extracted its nucleus and inserted it into a frog egg whose nucleus had been removed. The frog successfully developed into a tadpole, upending dogma at the time that said adult cells were irrevocably assigned specific functions. Gurdon’s experiment showed that adult genes could be reprogrammed. (FYI: Gurdon conducted his experiment using the African clawed frog (Xenopus), a laboratory stand-by. The image above depicts ready-to-hatch red-eyed tree frog  tadpoles, not typically used in research, but infinitely cuter.)
In 2006, Yamanaka followed up with an even-more astounding experiment. Using mice, he induced adult skin cells to revert back to stem cells, a state in which they are capable of developing into any kind of cell.
So-called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) are the workhorses of much stem cell science today. Researchers use them in hopes of one day being able to grow replacement neurons for neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s or new tissues for damaged organs, such as the liver or heart.
Most recently, Japanese researchers showed the utility of stem cells in future fertility treatments, growing both egg and sperm cells from iPSCs, then combining them to produce healthy offspring.

ohyeahdevelopmentalbiology:

ucsdhealthsciences:

Tidings of stem

Yesterday’s announcement that John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka would share the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine is the latest evidence that stem cell science has come a long, long way – though not yet where scientists, doctors and ordinary people hope it will someday be.

Gurdon and Yamanaka were honored for a pair of landmark discoveries made almost half a century later.

In 1962, Gurdon was the first to clone an animal. Taking an intestinal cell from an adult frog, Gurdon extracted its nucleus and inserted it into a frog egg whose nucleus had been removed. The frog successfully developed into a tadpole, upending dogma at the time that said adult cells were irrevocably assigned specific functions. Gurdon’s experiment showed that adult genes could be reprogrammed. (FYI: Gurdon conducted his experiment using the African clawed frog (Xenopus), a laboratory stand-by. The image above depicts ready-to-hatch red-eyed tree frog  tadpoles, not typically used in research, but infinitely cuter.)

In 2006, Yamanaka followed up with an even-more astounding experiment. Using mice, he induced adult skin cells to revert back to stem cells, a state in which they are capable of developing into any kind of cell.

So-called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) are the workhorses of much stem cell science today. Researchers use them in hopes of one day being able to grow replacement neurons for neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s or new tissues for damaged organs, such as the liver or heart.

Most recently, Japanese researchers showed the utility of stem cells in future fertility treatments, growing both egg and sperm cells from iPSCs, then combining them to produce healthy offspring.

328 notes